Mackay Base Hospital has first case of COVID-19. Picture: Heidi Petith
Mackay Base Hospital has first case of COVID-19. Picture: Heidi Petith

CORONAVIRUS: Island to remain open after confirmed case

UPDATE: A WOMAN admitted to Mackay Hospital yesterday with coronavirus was found on the beach, after reportedly not understanding the directive to self-isolate after testing positive to the virus in New South Wales.

The UK tourist defied health orders and flew to Hamilton Island after being diagnosed with the novel coronavirus in Sydney.

It is understood the woman, in her mid-30s, was found on a Hamilton Island beach after NSW Health authorities alerted their Queensland counterparts.

She was isolated on Hamilton Island on Sunday night and transferred by boat to Mackay.

The woman, believed to have been in Australia for less than a week, is in the Mackay Base Hospital.

She is understood to have told health authorities she did not understand the directive to self-isolate after testing positive to COVID-19.

11AM: A WOMAN admitted to Mackay Hospital yesterday with coronavirus transited on Hamilton Island for three hours, according to a spokeswoman.

A statement from Hamilton Island Enterprises today confirmed that an international visitor, who arrived on the island on Sunday had returned a positive result to COVID-19.

"The individual was tested for COVID-19 in Sydney and boarded a flight to Hamilton Island, before being isolated and transferred off the island," the statement read.

The island has been advised by Queensland Health that there is no requirement for closure and contact tracing is complete, according to the spokeswoman.

"All of the procedures have been followed in accordance with government guidelines," she said.

10AM: Hamilton Island remains open to tourists after it was confirmed a woman, who tested positive to coronavirus, was transferred to Mackay.

The 36 year old woman was transferred from Hamilton Island after testing positive to the disease.

She is being cared for in Mackay Base Hospital.

She is understood to have been tested for the novel coronavirus in Sydney and flew to Hamilton Island before receiving the results.

The woman was isolated and transferred to the Mackay hospital after testing positive.

A Hamilton Island spokeswoman said there was no need to close the island after the positive test.

"Hamilton Island can confirm that an international visitor who arrived on the island has returned a positive result to COVID-19," an island statement said.

"Hamilton Island would like to stress that the safety and wellbeing of our guests and staff on the island is of utmost priority.

"We would like to remind anyone travelling to the island about the importance of strictly following the advice of the government and health authorities during this uncertain time."

A Hamilton Island spokeswoman said Queensland Health advice was that there was no need to close the island.

"It's very low risk," she said.

The tourist's case has been reported as part of NSW coronavirus figures.

It is understood a patient who tested positive for COVID-19 flew to Mackay after being told to self-isolate.
It is understood a patient who tested positive for COVID-19 flew to Mackay after being told to self-isolate.

INITIAL: MACKAY has its first confirmed case of coronavirus after a 36-year-old was admitted to hospital.

It is understood the patient tested positive interstate before flying into Hamilton Island on Friday.

The 36 year old was then located and admitted to hospital on Monday.

Queensland Health can confirm the 36 year old was being managed at Mackay Base Hospital after a confirmed COVID-19 positive result in New South Wales.

"Due to patient confidentiality, no further details can be provided," a Queensland Health spokeswoman said.

It is understood the patient travelled to Mackay after being told to self isolate once the results had come through.

Contact tracing is currently underway and the community will be notified if any other public health alerts are required.

This comes as Mackay police take part in a statewide crackdown on self-quarantine measures as efforts to slow down the spread of COVID-19 ramp up.

A police spokesperson confirmed Mackay police officers will be involved in performing checks, ensuring people at risk self-isolate for 14 days.

Some of those people include those who have re-entered the country from overseas trips.

Under Queensland's Public Health Act, the maximum penalty for not complying with quarantine health measures is $13,345.

On Sunday a sailor was evacuated from a bulk carrier moored off Hay Point under COVID-19 precautions.

RACQ CQ Rescue has flown an ill 29-year-old sailor from the bulk carrier Pan Bora which was moored at Hay Point yesterday. PICTURE: RACQ CQ Rescue
RACQ CQ Rescue has flown an ill 29-year-old sailor from the bulk carrier Pan Bora which was moored at Hay Point yesterday. PICTURE: RACQ CQ Rescue

The 39-year-old Filipino man had become unwell on the vessel Pan Bona and required immediate hospitalisation, an RACQ CQ Rescue spokeswoman said.

Because the vessel had been in port in South Korea about 18 days ago, the CQ Rescue crew wore personal protective equipment during the airlift.

A mandate has also been handed down by the Chief Justice and Chief Judge of the Supreme Court of Queensland and District Court of Queensland stating that all new jury trials have been suspended across the state.

Chief Justice Catherine Holmes AC and Chief Judge Kerry O'Brien have, as a precautionary measure, suspended all new trials requiring a jury in Queensland.

Other cases will proceed, but the courts are considering further adjustments to their procedures in order to deal with the challenges posed by COVID-19.

A Queensland Health spokesperson has confirmed Queensland Health has strategies and plans in place to ensure we are well prepared for all COVID-19. Photo: contributed
A Queensland Health spokesperson has confirmed Queensland Health has strategies and plans in place to ensure we are well prepared for all COVID-19. Photo: contributed

A Queensland Health spokeswoman said strategies and plans were in place to ensure "we are well prepared for all COVID-19 scenarios" with the onset peak predicted to be about mid-April.

"The people most at risk of having COVID-19 are those who have been to affected countries in the past 14 days, or where they have come into close contact with someone diagnosed with the virus," she said.

She urged that at this time Queenslanders should not be alarmed about novel coronavirus, but aware and informed.

"If you have been overseas in the past 14 days and have a fever or any respiratory symptoms please call 13HEALTH, your GP or local hospital to arrange an assessment," she said.

"Calling ahead to the GP surgery or hospital to let them know your symptoms and travel history helps them prepare for your arrival."